Category: Product Design

GFW18 – Winner of the Stand Award

Stand design for Graduate Fashion Week 2018 in London.
Freelance for the Fashion department of Edinburgh College of Art
Edinburgh, Scotland 2018

WINNER OF THE STAND AWARD

I designed this stand for Edinburgh College of Art with sustainability and usability as the core concepts.

Recycled & Recyclable Core

The core components (paper tubes and plastic sheets) are already recycled materials, linked together with paper clips and screws, making it easy to assemble, dismantle and reuse in another configuration. This also leaves the materials clean, free from glue or paint that would end their recycling cycle. The coat hangers are also made out of cardboards, except for the metal hooks and clips obviously.

Taking the concept further, additional storage boxes and decoration of the stand have been made from Graduate Fashion Week 2018 waste, collected on site from skips.

Accessible Showcase

The different heights of the tables make the stand accessible, as well as the shaping the space. This is enhanced by the lightning which brings up the portfolios and creates a unique, warm, boutique atmosphere. The petals have different heights to showcase different length of garments, and also giving every students equal opportunity to showcase their work.

Optimum Design

The design was though through to limit the amount of waste & lost raw material to a minimum; every millimetre counts!
The left over of the tubes used to create the hangers have been used to make the ‘heads’ of the mannequins and the lamps are designed using the centre of the petals.

New Beginning

Almost every elements of the stand will be repurposed for next years’ event or donated to local charities at the end of GFW18, and when the time comes, they can be recycled again at a local waste management centre!

 

 

Material

Kalico Plastic sheets
UK based company converting waste plastics into colourful, aesthetic boards
100% recycled , 100% recyclable

Paper tubes
UK based company
100% recyclable

EDIBLE plants
Origin UK
Will be donated to the community garden at the Edinburgh Royal Hospital

SCRAP MDF-BULBS-HOOKS-CLIPS
EU based companies, local shops
To be reused in the build of 2019 stand 

 

 

 

Thank you to

Mark Kobine for your help, advices and sharing pains aux chocolats.
Emily Ford-Halliday & Mal Burkinshaw for the opportunity and trusting me.
Linda Wilson, Juliet Dearden & Claire Ferguson for your support.
Wendy Bruce for your kindness and making everything easy.
Design Informatics for letting me use the studio and workshops.

The Day and Night Light by Éléonore Delisse

I made the clock, she made the lamp. Very close concept from my Circadian clock but with light. It is very elegant and I wish I came up with this idea (even if I still like very much my clock).
 


 
Text from Design Milk
 
The Day and Night Light by Éléonore Delisse is not only a beautiful, richly hued lamp, it also has a psychological benefit. The way the colors oscillate within the lamp is coordinated with the body’s circadian rhythm, and can help rebalance our internal cycles. Set to cycle every 24 hours, the light changes due to a slowly rotating dichroic glass. In the morning, it casts a cool blue light to stimulate wakefulness. In the evening, it shines a warm amber, resulting in increased melatonin production to aid with sleep. By mimicking natural daylight, it helps stop the negative affects of winter. For those who may suffer from seasonal affective disorder, the Day and Night Light might be the perfect alternative remedy.

The leaking hourglass

I started thinking about our survival needs, from what came the important question: why are we not more careful on what we do on the planet, when it is what offer us the possibility to live?

Our survival needs are:
– nutriment
– oxygen
– water
– appropriate atmospheric pressure

We can survive:
– 3 min without air
– 3 hours without a regulated body temperature
– 3 days without water
– 3 weeks without food

The one I am the most interested in is the water. Maybe because it is my favourite element to be in and my favourite drink 🙂
Our body is composed between 60% and 80% of water. It (water) provides the environment necessary for life.

A sandglass is meant to give the time like it is indefinite, but what if it was leaking ?

I am thinking to make one with water. The amount of water inside would be equivalent on the volume available on earth/per person, and would leak in accordance of the diminishing of the resource.

 
h-3393
 

Windows Phone Ad

Comical irony of this ad: it claims to offer us a savior that will end our perceived slavery to technology – in the form of more technology. As jarring as this logic is, it makes complete sense when taken as a prime example of capitalism taking something that could possibly subvert it and twisting it to its advantage.  “it can’t attempt to overthrow the tyranny of cellphones, because it is selling a phone” is spot-on – the obvious way to stop your phone from running your life is to get rid of it or at least stop carrying it all the time. This is problematic for capitalism because you can’t sell something that people can already do for free. The decision to address the problem (at least in the mind of the audience) without losing the ability to profit from its root cause is at once terrifyingly effective and par for the course.

On a slightly different (but hopefully related) tangent, the first part of this commercial can be easily construed as a panopticon. The people on their phones may be “connected” online, but the point the ad makes is how isolated they are in real life. The metaphorical observation tower here is occupied by the few people saying “Really? ” and the viewer watching the ad. The Windows Phone purports to break down the divisive cell walls of this panopticon, but all it’s really selling is the ability to pretend they don’t exist.  by Alex Beachum

From Critical commons

Bike safety gadgets

Revolights from Emeryville, California

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Revolights are a system of white and red LEDs mounted on the bike’s front and rear wheels which light up as the wheels spin. Sensors calculate how fast the wheels are spinning and turn the LEDs on and off to create arcs of light – white at the front and red at the back – which are visible from all angles. The original idea was actually to try to make a more efficient headlight by getting the light as close to the ground as possible. After the first prototype. the creator realised the huge added side visibility the motion of the lights created, which if you ride a bike you know is a big deal. Based on that he quickly made a red version for the rear wheel, and Revolights was born.


See.sense intelligent bike light from Northern Ireland

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The See.sense “intelligent” bike light uses sensor technology from smartphones to assess the rider’s environment and responds by making them more visible when they need it most. When the sensors detect that the cyclist is at a road junction or roundabout, or passing through a dark underpass, it tells the light to flash faster and brighter.

“My epiphany came when I was cycling along looking at the smart phone on my handlebars. I realised that the smart sensor technology it contained could be used to give a light situational awareness. In essence, the light could be bright when it needed to be and conserve energy at other times. ”


 Mission Lumen from San Francisco

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The Lumen – handmade by Mission Bicycle of San Francisco – is the world’s first commercially available bike with a “retro-reflective” coating – with the frame and rims painted with hundreds of thousands of microscopic transparent spheres. The bike looks grey during the day – but when light hits the spheres at night it bounces straight back to the source, in a retro-reflective “cat’s eye” effect.


 Loud bicycle horn from Boston

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There are a few bike horns on the market at the moment but, unlike some noisier rivals, the Loud Bicycle Horn is deliberately set at 112 decibels – mimicking a typical car horn. The two-tone sound closely matches the pitch of a car horn too. Inventor Jonathan Lansey, a research engineer, says drivers react to car horns immediately – without locating where the sound has come from first.

“There are some bike horns that are louder than car horns,” he adds. “But we found that the sound of a ‘proper’ car horn is just right to get a driver’s attention without damaging your ears. There has been a lot of research showing that car horns are one of the best sounds to deter accidents.”


 Hövding airbag from Sweden

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The Hövding – stocked in UK shops for the first time this month, a couple of years after its launch – is an airbag collar which inflates in under a tenth of a second when it detects the abnormal movement associated with a crash. The company cites crash tests by Swedish insurance company Folksam, which compared the Hövding to traditional cycle helmets and found it performed far better in reducing the chances of serious head injury or fatal injury.


 Helios smart handlebars from California

Helios handlebars

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Helios handlebars feature a super-bright headlight at the front, and two lights on the ends of the bars which can be used as directional indicators. Once connected to a smartphone using Bluetooth, the bar-end lights flash to offer easy-to-see turn-by-turn GPS navigation too.

 

Article from The guardian

Cardboard Carrier

Architects Design Cardboard Carrier to Improve City Cycling

 

“There’s no denying that biking is one of the biggest trends in urban development right now, with many touting cycling as the solution to reducing pollution and congestion – not to mention its health benefits. As cities are focusing on what they can do to encourage cycling and make their streets bike-friendly, architects have played a critical role in ushering bikes into the city, designing everything from  protected cycle lanes to elaborate elevated cycletracks. Yet after cycling in Vienna for eight years, two architecture students decided to take a different – and simpler – approach to improving biking conditions. Focusing on the often cumbersome task of trying to run errands while on a bike, Philipp Moherndl and Matthias Lechner have designed a lightweight, recyclable cardboard pannier that can seamlessly go from store to bike.

“Due to the mass appeal of the bike, conventional cycling accessories do not fit the lifestyle of many urban cyclists,” Moherndl and Lechner told ArchDaily. “The limited transport capacity of usual bicycles makes shopping difficult and inflexible. People often do their shopping spontaneously, on their way home or whilst cycling in the city. Therefore we wanted to come up with a more flexible solution: a multi-use bag for bicycles, which is low priced and environmentally-friendly.”

Ideally, the Packtasche would be provided as an alternative to plastic bags at store checkout. It can be folded quickly, filled with groceries or other purchases and then carried to the bike where it can go directly onto the rack, Lechner explained.

“Our main goal was to make cycling in the city even more practical and attractive than it already is,” Lechner said. “The Packtasche is our small contribution to make cycling more attractive to people and hence support sustainable urban mobility.”

The idea started when the two took part in an international idea’s competition on the topic “Cycling in the City.”  “As the spontaneous transportation of groceries and other goods had always been a difficult task for cyclists, we decided to work on that particular problem,” Lechner said. “We designed the Packtasche as an easy-to-use transportation device both for cyclists and pedestrians. Besides the durability of the Packtasche on the bike, a smooth transition between carrying the bag and using it cycling was key in our development process.”.” from archdaily

 

Internet of things

A series of examples of things from the internet of things


 

Nokia Treasure Tag

 

 

“Attach the The Nokia Treasure Tag onto your important possessions, and it will notify you when you are about to leave them behind. The treasure tag works best with Lumia Black software, so Nokia recommends updating your Lumia smartphone to get the most out of your Nokia Treasure Tag.” From microsoft.com


 

Qinergy

 

 

see, understand and control energy consumption at home


HAPIfork

 

 

The HAPIfork is a “smart fork” designed to monitor your eating habits.


 

Parrot Flower Power

 

 

An incredible sensor that assesses your plants’ needs and sends alerts to your smartphone. From Parrot