Tag: water

The leaking hourglass

I started thinking about our survival needs, from what came the important question: why are we not more careful on what we do on the planet, when it is what offer us the possibility to live?

Our survival needs are:
– nutriment
– oxygen
– water
– appropriate atmospheric pressure

We can survive:
– 3 min without air
– 3 hours without a regulated body temperature
– 3 days without water
– 3 weeks without food

The one I am the most interested in is the water. Maybe because it is my favourite element to be in and my favourite drink 🙂
Our body is composed between 60% and 80% of water. It (water) provides the environment necessary for life.

A sandglass is meant to give the time like it is indefinite, but what if it was leaking ?

I am thinking to make one with water. The amount of water inside would be equivalent on the volume available on earth/per person, and would leak in accordance of the diminishing of the resource.

 
h-3393
 

Icy pendant lamp

 

Swedish designers Siri Bahlenberg and Sofia Bergfeldt have created a lampshade made of ice that slowly melts back into its mould so it can be re-frozen and used again. Encased in an angular block of ice, the Melt and Recreate lamp is illuminated using a combination of LED lights and fibre optics. The LEDs are suspended above the ice and the light that they emit is conducted through the solid mass by the fibre optics – making the potentially lethal combination of water and electricity safe. The light is diffused through the frozen water, giving off a dim glow that gradually becomes brighter as the melted ice drips away.

“In one way it’s a throwaway product because it disappears, but we keep the water so it can be remade,” Siri Bahlenberg and Sofia Bergfeldt told Dezeen. The LEDs and fibre optics are contained within an element that detaches from the metal fixture. This element sits on top of the mould so the water freezes around it, holding it in place. Once solid, the element and its icy shade are clipped back into the conical fixture and connected to the electricity supply.

The lamp’s original mould is placed below the pendant to collect the meltwater, ready to be reused.

“We wanted to create a relationship between the user and product,” said Bahlenberg and Bergfeldt. “For this lamp to have a continuing life, the product has to be reborn and you have to engage with it to make that work.”

“We want to awaken reflection and awareness about the consumption of everyday objects that often are taken for granted,” they added.

It takes 10 hours for the lamp to melt and another 10 hours for it to refreeze – and each casting is different. Depending on the ambient conditions, the ice may be clear or translucent. The dimensions of the plastic mould are designed to fit a standard-sized freezer. Bahlenberg and Bergfeldt designed the light to become a centrepiece for a room. “Just like enjoying a fireplace, the lamp brings a natural element to the home that creates a soothing environment, both visually and with the soft dripping sound,” they said.

From dezeen

Black water vortex

I generally like Kappoor’s work, but I am particularly impressed by this one. Recreate this kind of phenomenon relate of the magic in our mind. The images are beautiful but I guess that seeing it for real might be hypnotic. And from the explanation of this work (see bellow) I understand why his work fascinate me: he is playing with boundaries 🙂

the kochi-muziris biennale is india’s first biennale for contemporary art being held in kochi. one of the festival’s biggest draws is legendary artist anish kapoor‘s ‘descension’, created especially for the event. kapoor — long renowned for his large-scale, invasive sculptural works — sets visitors within the harrowing space at aspinwall house, fort kochi, where a caged vortex of black water spins down a seemingly bottomless hole in the gallery floor. a perpetually rushing whirlpool churns into the ground, entrancing observers in its continuity, and creating a spine-chilling atmosphere for those nearby. contained within the circular gate, ‘descension’ naturally draws visitors to peer as far down to its depths as they can, but it is kapoor’s masterful play with boundaries that keeps them constantly intrigued. Text from Designboom

Watermark

 

I had a lot of thought after seeming this movie during take one action festival. First on the impact human choices have on nature (pollution, dry rivers, immerge lands…), even you know all of that having it in front of our eyes like that is like a huge slap into the face, and make you reconsider some of your choice and actions. Also the huge inequality on the planet about the access to water: 748 million people doesn’t have access to clean water every day. And all the derived problems about sanitation: 2.5 billion people don’t have access to adequate sanitation, one in three of the world’s population and a child dies every minute because they don’t have toilets.

The final sentence of the movie tell that we are all compose of 70% of water, we are all human. Since it kind of obsesses me, as I would like to find the perfect way to visualise that. It is for me a perfect image to be reminded that WE ARE ALL HUMAN. It could help to fight racism, inequality…

 

 

WATERMARK  is a feature documentary from multiple-award winning filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nick de Pencier, and renowned photographer Edward Burtynsky, making their second collaboration after Manufactured Landscapesin 2006. Watermark is the third part of Burtynsky’s Water project which includes a book and major photographic exhibition. Shot in stunning 5K ultra high-definition video and full of soaring aerial perspectives, this film shows water as a terraforming element and the scale of its reach, as well as the magnitude of our need and use. In Watermark, the viewer is immersed in a world defined by a magnificent force of nature that we all too often take for granted – until it’s gone.


Before the start of the movie, instead having add they projected this campaign from Water aid, and I think everyone should see it and reflect on it: