Tag: information

SAAD

I created this project, in collaboration with PhD Hadi Mehrpouya, as the final piece of my master thesis.

Please have a look at our WEBSITE to have more informations about the project.
 
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Abstract
Everyday we get bombarded with data and information from all over the world. Often we feel helpless about our abilities to do things while being trapped in the dilemma of knowing the consequences of our consumptions and choices. Playing on these feelings, SAAD, from Afrikaans meaning Seed, is visualising human deaths as a direct and indirect result of the mining industry and conflict minerals in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), used to build smart-phones and computers. The project is constructed on different layers which all recall the idea of being on the edge, the border between life and death, and emphasise the complexity of nothing being either totally positive or negative. SAAD is composed of two complementary installations: a seed dispenser and a plant, visualising deaths due to the mining industry in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). It aims to push the reflexion of the responsibility Western consumer users of smartphones and computers have towards these workers. It plays on the feeling of being helpless towards the different issues our societies are facing. The project is constructed on different layers which all recall the idea of being on the edge, the border between life and death, and emphasise the complexity of nothing being either totally positive or negative. It aims to symbolise the complexity of today’s world and the difficulty to position the self and the ethic in it. We choose to focus on the partial perspective we have of our electronic devices nowadays, as it is something most Europeans possessed and use everyday without questioning the impact it can have on other human beings and the natural environment.
 

Abandoned Underworld

 

“Aboveground, London is an exceptionally clean and well-groomed city, but its streets hide an dystopian-looking underworld, blocked off from the vast majority of the public for decades. There are networks of dank hidden sewers, cable conduits, road and utility tunnels, old catacombs, and abandoned train tubes. Now, a daring group of self-identified “place hackers” is using photography to bring this chthonic region to light, however forbidden their explorations may be.

Every single photograph in the book was “taken without permission from anyone,” writes editor Bradley Garrett, who works by day as a geography researcher at the University of Oxford. Garrett says the 12 photographers included here chose to remain anonymous for fear of a response by authorities. Another six subterranean photographers refused to include their work in the book, and after hearing it would be published, one went so far as to burn four years’ worth of her negatives, fearing arrest.

Armed with headlamps and cameras, these rogue archaeologists climbed over palisade fencing and barbed wire; lowered themselves on ropes through ventilation shafts; and popped manholes open, all to access moldy, sprawling, often pitch-black nether regions, inhabited only by vermin. “Walking miles of empty tunnels, we found it difficult to comprehend the rent per square foot we paid for our flats,” says Garrett.

There’s a political element to this verboten spelunking, a call to challenge the status quo of how the public interacts with urban infrastructure. “We stand by our belief that publicly funded architectural projects should be visible and accessible to the hard-working public whose tax revenue made them possible in the first place,” Garrett writes. “Our photography, in that respect, is doing the dual political work of making urban places more open, more free, more transparent and more accessible . . . Our cameras are the more powerful weapons in a war over freedom of information.” From Fastcodesign

6 examples of Data visualisation

Some great data visualisation. Some are not conventional, other are interactives…, one thing that have in common is that they allow to understand and visualise the information very clearly and in a beautiful way.


Data Paris

Visualisation of the data about Paris and Parisians, organise around the subway network. Very well done, interactive and reliable sources. It gives a understanding of how the goods, humans, propriety are spread in the french capital.

 


The global flow of people

Explore new estimates of migration flows between and within regions for five-year periods, 1990 to 2010. Click on a region to discover flows country-by-country. It can help to visualise the ‘reality’ and transform some ‘stereotypes’.

 

 


Where does my money go

Where Does My Money Go? aims to promote transparency and citizen engagement through the analysis and visualisation of information about UK public spending.

 

 


Spending Stories

Spending Stories is a project by the Open Knowledge Foundation aiming at improving fiscal literacy and providing greater awareness of budget data worldwide.

 

 


Humans of New York

Creation of an exhaustive catalogue of New York City’s inhabitants. He set out to photograph 10,000 New Yorkers and plot their photos on a map, then he started collecting quotes and short stories from the people he met, and began including these snippets alongside the photographs. Taken together, these portraits and captions became the subject of a vibrant blog and collection of data. 


Information is beautiful

Finally, this website is dedicated to distilling the world’s data, information and knowledge into beautiful, interesting and, above all, useful visualizations, infographics and diagrams.

 

Pink Street

Architects: Jose Adrião Arquitectos
Location: Rua Nova do Carvalho, Lisbon, Portugal
Design Team: Carla Gonçalves, Ricardo Aboim Inglez, Tiago Pereira
Project Year: 2012

 

 

 

” From the architect. In December 2011 Nova do Carvalho Street [Rua Nova do Carvalho] in Cais do Sodré was painted in pink colour. The gesture of painting a street in pink synthesizes in a very pragmatic and effective way the need for change. It created a dynamic public space, inclusive, opened and multifunctional which enables access to one of the most precious values of our time: information. At Pink Street one produces, shares and consumes culture.

The colour announced a change of which a significant number of people adhere. Nova do Carvalho Street at Cais do Sodré was named Pink Street. The proposal aims to strengthen the character established with the previous intervention, giving ot continuity and permanency.

The proposal consists of levelling the sidewalk with the road so as to turn the existing space in a public space without continuous barriers. Along the street 8 MUPIS are assembled, which can be used for exhibitions (individual/collectives, night/day) or simple to advertise for events taking place. The 8 MUPIS can be used as well as street lamps, in case they information/exhibition contained apart from light. These lamps may change its tonality according to the character of the event they are associated with.”  from Archdaily