Tag: responsibility

SAAD

I created this project, in collaboration with PhD Hadi Mehrpouya, as the final piece of my master thesis.

Please have a look at our WEBSITE to have more informations about the project.
 
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Abstract
Everyday we get bombarded with data and information from all over the world. Often we feel helpless about our abilities to do things while being trapped in the dilemma of knowing the consequences of our consumptions and choices. Playing on these feelings, SAAD, from Afrikaans meaning Seed, is visualising human deaths as a direct and indirect result of the mining industry and conflict minerals in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), used to build smart-phones and computers. The project is constructed on different layers which all recall the idea of being on the edge, the border between life and death, and emphasise the complexity of nothing being either totally positive or negative. SAAD is composed of two complementary installations: a seed dispenser and a plant, visualising deaths due to the mining industry in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). It aims to push the reflexion of the responsibility Western consumer users of smartphones and computers have towards these workers. It plays on the feeling of being helpless towards the different issues our societies are facing. The project is constructed on different layers which all recall the idea of being on the edge, the border between life and death, and emphasise the complexity of nothing being either totally positive or negative. It aims to symbolise the complexity of today’s world and the difficulty to position the self and the ethic in it. We choose to focus on the partial perspective we have of our electronic devices nowadays, as it is something most Europeans possessed and use everyday without questioning the impact it can have on other human beings and the natural environment.
 

What if we were removing all the traffic lights ?

 

I came across a very interesting study in the book Ground control going against an idea firmly fixed in ‘everyone’s’ mind.  To resolved security on the streets and roads most of people will be tended to install all kind of signage, barriers, traffic lights, to separate the different kind of users (cyclists, pedestrians, drivers…).  A Dutch engineer, Hans Monderman, proved that all these artefacts intended to keep pedestrians and motorists apart and discourage both groups from engaging with each other, making interactions dangerous (Minton, 2009, p. 179). Experiences tend to prove that by removing all signs and protective objects the number of accident decrease drastically (44%), as it forces people ‘to look each other in the eye, to judge body language and learn to take responsibility’ (Minton, 2009, p. 181).

Source: Minton, A. (2009). Ground control. London: Penguin Group.