Tag: story

Tales of Synthetic Biology

More informations in the report produced along the process.

I imagined an activity composed of cards that allows participants to ‘create’ personalised engineered ‘thing’. They first would have to choose an ‘organism’ and then create a sequence in order to modify it; and finally explain the story behind their creation. Encouraged to reflect on the implications and outcomes (positive and negative) of such creation, it would give both insights of what the general public inspirations for synthetic biology are and a vision of the hopes and fears of the society. Moreover, it would introduce the basic grammar of DNA and its visualisation.
The aim of this activity is not only to inform participants about the processes of DNA design but also to invite reflection on what it means to design through living organisms.

 

 

I have conducted a series of interview with biologists to determine what how they would communicate the DNA design process to the general public: how to keep the process simple but accurate and what could be an interesting interaction to understand the principles of synthetic biology (the same interviews helped to develop the ‘Dominoes’ project).

The final design is a set of cards composed of 25 organisms cards (plus 15 blank ones), 8 promoters, 15 coding sequences (CDS) (plus 15 blank ones) & 8 terminator, as well as 53 story cards, allowing the participants to explain the story behind their creation.

I have tested them during 5 sessions (more than 20 people from designers, artists, biologists, engineers, technicians…) and twice during Louise Mackenzie ‘Transformation – Thinking Through Making With Life transgenic bio-art’ workshops at ASCUS lab Summerhall as part of Edinburgh International Science Festival 2017.

 

 

In total I collected: 36 stories, 10 new CDSs and 5 new organisms.

There is no clear tendency in the answers, same range of fantasy story (8%) than proposal for health (7%). Being able to gather more data would help to identify a trend (if there is one). I could imagine developing a webapp, where users could create in the same way (with drag and drop) sequences and write stories link to them. Then, they could share them on social media.
In addition, it would allow to collect thoughts, reactions from the comments and like section. A very small questionnaire after the activity could also help to gather the data from the type of story produced, allowing live data analysis.

Half of the stories are human-centred, while only one quarter would modify human. It suggests that most of the modi cation imagined would be beneficial for humans even if an animal or a plant is the target of the modi cation.

Even though I encouraged to reflect on the consequences (advantages, risks…) on the story card, only 3 stories have a sentence about it. To get more insight on this aspect and encourage broader reflection, designing a longer activity would be necessary.
The sequence and the story would be the first chapter, then the participant of the workshop could have to spot what are the elements part of the ecosystem of this organism and relations with some aspects of human society: cultural effects, group behaviour, social change, social trade-offs, political and economic systems, social conflict, global interdependence… It would be asked to reflect on these connections and establish where could be the potential risks, dangers, uncertainties but also advantages, benefits or values. Each group could analyse the sequence of other groups. From that – chapter 3 – they would come back to their original design and have to change it, taking into consideration the observations from chapter 2. A second iteration of
the second chapter and a third iteration of the sequence could be considered. It would help to illustrate that each choice creates new conditions and entanglements with other factors which result in more constrains in the design.
The aim would be to emphasise the interconnectivity of ecosystems and human society, and how synthetic biology could become an important source of disturbance and that each new design should be carefully considered.

 

 

 

In order to allow to reflect on some of the stories already created, promote the project and share the ideas, I have decided to illustrate some of the cards. We could imagine a series of ‘postcards from the future’ as a series of illustration, promoted on a dedicated website or in an exhibition during a scientific conference, where these stories could be the starting point to discuss public opinion and ideas on synthetic biology as well as the implications of the discipline in human society and on natural ecosystem.

 

 

The next step in the development of this project would be to redesign the cards and create a game. Some aspects have already been explore with the help of Erika Szymanski, Research Fellow, Science, Technology & Innovation Studies at the University of Edinburgh.

Rune Guneriussen

 

” Rune Guneriussen, born 1977, in Norway. Education from Surrey Institute of Art & Design in England. Live and work in eastern Norway. Is an artist working in the transition between installation and photography. As a conceptual artist he works site specific, primarily in nature. The work on objects started in 2005, and has been photographed on locations all over Norway.

It is not as much photography as it is about sculpture and installation. The long oneman work on an largescale installation is a process triggering the artistic genom. This process involves the object, story, space and most important the time it is made within. It is an approach to the balance between nature and human culture, and all the sublevels of our own excistence. The work is made solely on site, and the photographs represents the reality of the installation itself.

As an artist he believes strongly that art itself should be questioning and bewildering as opposed to patronising and restricting. As opposed to the current fashion he does not want to dictate a way to the understanding of his art, but rather indicate a path to understanding a story. ”  From his web site

 

Growing Data

 

Growing Data
data visualization research project
by onformative a studio for generative design

Growing Data is a research project that examines how real processes and structures can be used to create an alternative form of data visualization to traditional statistical diagrams. Formal aspects of the most diverse natural phenomena are translated into visual systems. Generative strategies in particular lend themselves to creating visual patterns and structures, while the human brain is a master at quickly interpreting such structures and assembling these into an overall picture. Both of these characteristics are used to depict data in a different way. Rather than using the same abstract forms of data visualization over and over again, the main objective hereby is to allow new images to emerge that are not committed to the precision of the data but that tell a story and provide a quick overview.

The main objective is to allow new images to emerge that are not committed to the precision of the data but that tell a story and provide a quick overview.

The project Growing Data is a part of this series and, using virtual plant growth, examines the possibilities of visualizing the air quality in various large cities. If one considers using plants or other growing life forms for this, the most obvious thing is to use the growth itself as the indicator for the changing data. Just as properties of the plants’ growth are determined by external influences, various data can control different aspects of digital growth. This data is assigned to different variables, which, for example, are responsible for life span, density and speed of growth. In order to relay information more directly and to reinforce its message, an additional information level is added in which names, words and symbols are gradually created from the growing structures.
Connected to various data interface and data bases, both the current data of various large cities and the reference values from other years can be visualized. The program is based primarily on a complex version of the “agent model” in which various agents are controlled by Brownian motion and are influenced in their movement by various variables.