Tag: social

Reciprocity

I invigilated Reciprocity exhibition by Patrick Stevenson-Keating and jewellers Jonathan Matthew Boyd and Adam Henderson at RBS West End Branch in Edinburgh for two weeks this summer.
It was unlikely to have it in a Bank when the topic was about imagining a different way of banking, imagining the future of banking in a quite subversive way.

Description of the exhibition from Design Informatics web site:
Can the most mundane of financial transactions be used as a force for good? Designer Patrick Stevenson-Keating tests the possibilities through his imaginary bank with its own notes, debit card and cash dispenser. Highlighting our normally passive role within the global economic system he shows that money and finance are not just tools for buying and selling but for shaping society. Reciprociti was commissioned through the Design Museum’s Designers in Residence programme 2014 and will be the first time it has been shown in Scotland.
Alongside Patrick’s installation will be the work of jewellers Jonathan Matthew Boyd and Adam Henderson which questions the perceptions of innate value by considering the materials, processes and concepts which determine it. Curated by Saltmarket Design, the exhibit explores these dynamics by displaying the use of current technologies, questioning physical form and how individuals use technology to create social dialogues.

 

 

After the first day of the exhibition one of the jewellery piece has been censored, as a customers argued that it was not appropriated for a bank. The piece is called WEAR A JONNY (gold brooches in the form of unused condoms):
The artists described it as follow: “JONNIES are the strangest commodity. The ultimate one-use product; their use can save lives and prevent disease. They are a cheap and effective product which despite their visual aesthetic should be celebrated. GOLD a commodity, which we hold in the highest value. A gold JONNY, question your values and wear with pride.”

 

The Death Of Conversation

Babycakes Romero is primarily a street photographer dedicated to documenting the world around him. He photographed People Obsessed With Their Smartphones

He said: “I don’t have a problem with portable tech specifically, because our devices facilitate our lives, but I believe it is making people seriously dull…

I started to photograph people in company on their phones as there was a certain symmetry to them and it appealed on a visual level, but as I continued I noticed an inherent sadness to the proceedings.

Before mobile phones were invented, people would have had no choice but to interact. However, that is no longer necessary as we can all now “pretend” we are doing something “important” on our devices rather than think of something to say. This is killing conversation. I believe it’s increasing social pain.

Most people used to use cigarettes as a social prop. Admittedly, they’re bad for your health, but at least they didn’t turn people into ‘plugged in’ bores. Together we must be strong and release ourselves from the shackles of smartphones and bring face-to-face chat back!”

More info: babycakesromero.com