Tag: energy

Icy pendant lamp

 

Swedish designers Siri Bahlenberg and Sofia Bergfeldt have created a lampshade made of ice that slowly melts back into its mould so it can be re-frozen and used again. Encased in an angular block of ice, the Melt and Recreate lamp is illuminated using a combination of LED lights and fibre optics. The LEDs are suspended above the ice and the light that they emit is conducted through the solid mass by the fibre optics – making the potentially lethal combination of water and electricity safe. The light is diffused through the frozen water, giving off a dim glow that gradually becomes brighter as the melted ice drips away.

“In one way it’s a throwaway product because it disappears, but we keep the water so it can be remade,” Siri Bahlenberg and Sofia Bergfeldt told Dezeen. The LEDs and fibre optics are contained within an element that detaches from the metal fixture. This element sits on top of the mould so the water freezes around it, holding it in place. Once solid, the element and its icy shade are clipped back into the conical fixture and connected to the electricity supply.

The lamp’s original mould is placed below the pendant to collect the meltwater, ready to be reused.

“We wanted to create a relationship between the user and product,” said Bahlenberg and Bergfeldt. “For this lamp to have a continuing life, the product has to be reborn and you have to engage with it to make that work.”

“We want to awaken reflection and awareness about the consumption of everyday objects that often are taken for granted,” they added.

It takes 10 hours for the lamp to melt and another 10 hours for it to refreeze – and each casting is different. Depending on the ambient conditions, the ice may be clear or translucent. The dimensions of the plastic mould are designed to fit a standard-sized freezer. Bahlenberg and Bergfeldt designed the light to become a centrepiece for a room. “Just like enjoying a fireplace, the lamp brings a natural element to the home that creates a soothing environment, both visually and with the soft dripping sound,” they said.

From dezeen

New proposals: Production vs Edison

Based on the research summerized in the article Research around the turntable I propose two new concepts (after the first one: The World as Turntables).

In Homage to Thomas Edison

Edison was a prolific inventor. He is particularly well know for the invention of the electric light and power utilities, sound recording, and motion pictures all established major new industries world- wide. Edison’s inventions contributed to mass communication and, in particular, telecommunications. Using this information that turntable and electric light have the same inventor, I propose an installation linking two topics of the gallery changing nation in the museum of Scotland : DAILY LIFE – HOME TECHNOLOGY and ENERGY – SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY.

The turntable would be transformed into generator, when it is playing, touching a special venial, it will generate light, using the rotation of the turntable to generate electricity or/and the contact of the needle onto the vinyl.

 

proposal 3

Production line/Linn

The turntable in the museum is a Linn Sondek LP12. Linn  is one of the stalwarts of the British hi-fi industry. Taking its name from a local park  in Glasgow, Linn was  founded in the early ’70s and started off with just one product – the legendary LP12 turntable. Since then the company has developed an impressively comprehensive product range.

I was thinking to recreate the production line of the turntable by generating sounds from each steps of the production, from raw material to finish product. The single harm could go from one turntable to another, picking the sound related to the action (we should figure it out how we generate the sound: which data ? record in the factory ? …).
The harm would reading the sound, then add the second one on top of it. Like record a sample then add one on top of each other on the same principle of a loop pedal (exemple here)

It could be a reflection of the factory process (linking the communication part to the industry part of the gallery).

It also play on the on the production line method of the construction a mass produce product and the brand of the turntable Linn.

Finally there is a reflection on the music procession as well. The evolution of music and the possibility that turntable offered to musicians: Turntablism, which is the art of manipulating sounds and creating music using direct- drive turntables and a DJ mixer: the record player becomes a musical instrument. DJ use turntable to mix and samples. This installation would also be a homage to this art.

proposal 2

Combination of both

Edison was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and because of that, he is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory. From this information we can easy imagine and justify that these 2 concept could become a single one.

If the world’s population lived like…

Tim De Chant created this great infographic “if the world’s population lived like…” He used data set that allows for reliable comparisons—the National Footprint Account from the Global Footprint Network. He argues that “their methodology is consistent and comprehensive. Each country’s footprint is assembled from sub-footprints, ranging from cropland to carbon to urbanization to fishing grounds.” He used only terrestrial sub-footprints.

ecological-footprint-by-country

 

It is related to my ideas and concept of the world as turntable , and how to bring responsibility on our actions which have long term consequences. We can’t continue to live the way we do ! The issue is how to change our way of living with the standard we have now ? Moreover what could be the design solutions to make this reflection and foster little changes ?

I made some research on the vocabulary around this topic : Ecological footprint  –  Earth’s energy budget  –  World energy consumption

And found this article from the MailOnlineWe’ve used up all the resources the Earth can provide for the year and are now in ‘overdraft’, campaigners warn

“The world has now reached ‘earth overshoot day’, the point in the year that humans have exhausted supplies such land, trees and fish. We have also outstripped the planet’s annual capacity to absorb waste products including carbon dioxide, the Global Footprint Network says”

And this is the Living Planet Report 2014 Facts, which doesn’t deliver good news…

Finally we shall all do this test from the WWF : HOW BIG IS YOUR ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT?

My result is not good…

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Use of the street by the inhabitants: Bristol and Brighton examples

Bristol

Article from the Gardian: Your street should be more than a road. Emma McGowan looks at how to reduce the noise of traffic and increase the noise of play in your neighbourhood. Bristol example in blue.

“People are growing much more aware of the impact of traffic, including air pollution and crowded residential streets,” says Sian Berry from the Campaign for Better Transport. “It’s not surprising that communities are taking action to make their streets quieter, cleaner and friendlier.”

There are a number of approaches you can take. The charity Sustranshelps communities redesign their streets to prioritise pedestrians and cyclists over cars. Its two-year DIY Streets project in Haringey in north London reduced traffic at monitoring sites by 10%.

Finlay McNab, national projects coordinator at Sustrans, says that people shouldn’t feel daunted by the process of getting a street layout changed to reduce traffic or to slow it down. “You can do more than you think if you’re prepared to go to council meetings,” he says. “You can achieve a lot, even with small amounts of money.”

Another approach is to try to change the mindset of road users by altering the appearance of the road. The Victoria Parade Residents Association in Bristol applied to its neighbourhood partnership access fund for money to purchase giant colourful stickers that were then blowtorched onto the road surface.

“Ours is a long, one-way street that’s used by drivers as a cut-through between two main roads,” says resident Jim McEwan. “We wanted to do something that would make drivers turning into the road think ‘hang on, people live here’.

“There’s no limit to how creative you can be with thermoplastic road markings. We viewed the road as a 150-metre long canvas. We ran art workshops and had a street party where we tried out our designs in poster paint on the road. And from the start we had our local councillor on board, which was critical.”

Getting people to see the street as a community resource is important. “A high proportion of traffic will be made up of people who live locally,” says Finlay. “A street party can make people more receptive to the idea of traffic reduction.”

Playing Out, the Bristol-based community interest company that encourages street play across the UK, successfully lobbied its local authority to introduce temporary play street orders, which allow residential streets to be closed to traffic for up to three hours a week, every week for a year.

“The orders work best when people really consult with their neighbours,” says Naomi Fuller, communications officer at Playing Out. 

“And it can be a good idea to apply to do a one-off to see if there’s an appetite to do more and whether you have enough people willing to be stewards.

“The benefits are felt by all residents, not just the kids. When I went to apologise to an elderly couple on my street about the noise the children had made, they said they preferred the sound of children playing over the noise of cars speeding down the road and doors slamming.”

Screen Shot 2014-11-09 at 15.33.34 Screen Shot 2014-11-09 at 15.33.24

Visit the Playing Out website to find out if your local authority has some form of play street order. If not, lobby your local councillor.

Your local transition group is also a good starting point; it may have traffic-reducing projects under way that you could help with. Or ask your local council if your community has a neighbourhood plan, which should include information about transport and traffic issues, as well as ideas for improvements. 

A walk to school campaign can also help reduce traffic. The charity Living Streets has been campaigning since 1929 to make the streets safer and more attractive, largely by getting more people walking. If your school isn’t one of the 2,000 across the UK involved in Living Streets’ Walk to School campaign, contact your headteacher or ask your local authority to involve all schools in your area.

“One of the things we do is look at what is stopping people from walking their children to school,” says Kevin Golding-Williams, public affairs and policy manager at Living Streets. “It can be anything from poorly maintained pavements to traffic congestion around the school gate. Addressing those barriers can have a big impact on getting people out of their cars. 

“We also conduct street audits with local authorities and community groups to identify what improvements could be made. That might be removing unnecessary bollards or other obstructive street furniture to help make walking safer and easier.”


Brighton

Article from the Gardian: Tidy St: Shining a light on community energy efficiency. Residents of a Brighton street are taking part in a project to monitor daily energy use

The old adage that you can’t manage what you don’t measure is particularly pertinent when it comes to household energy use, which soared by 13.4% in 2010. Few people measure their weekly or even daily electricity consumption, which makes it hard for them to work out, where cuts might be possible – even if they wanted to.

Enter Tidy Street in Brighton. Residents who volunteered for a new energy-saving initiative have been given electricity meters so they can monitor their daily energy use, and identify which devices are using the most power, and when. For the past three weeks, they have been entering daily meter readings on tidystreet.org, to build up a picture of each household’s energy use.

Once people started measuring – 17 of the street’s 52 households signed up straight away – local street artist Snub was commissioned to paint the street’s average energy use against the Brighton average in a graph on the road outside their homes.

“It’s a great way to do it,” says Paul Clark, a software developer who has lived on Tidy Street for 10 years. “It engages people – passers-by often ask what it’s all about – and for those of us that live here, it’s something to be proud of.”

Open-source software designed specially for the project allows each household to compare their energy use not only with the Brighton average, but also with the national average or even that of other countries. Involving the community was key to getting the project off the ground, says Jon Bird, the project co-ordinator and designer of the software.

“I went along to the residents’ annual street party last year, and explained what we were trying to do; that it was voluntary and that no one was trying to impose anything on anyone,” he says.

“Then it was a case of identifying the ‘champions’ in the street – those who were going to tell their neighbours about the project; those who were going to be doing the measuring in the individual households.”

Each household has chosen its own icon to mark the data points on the street and online graphs and residents’ input helps foster the sense they own the project.

Electricity-usage-marking-009 Chart1

Ruth Goodall, 70, who has lived on Tidy Street for 30 years, says she wasn’t interested in her electricity use before the initiative but measuring it every day has inspired her to change her behaviour. “I always used to fill up my kettle to the top but having seen how much extra power that uses I’m careful to just boil what I need,” she says.

Strikingly, over the three weeks the project has been running, the street’s average energy use has dropped by 15%, with some people cutting usage by as much as 30%. Much of this has been achieved by simple behavioural changes such as turning of lights and devices on standby.

“Now the challenge is to see if those reductions can be maintained,” says Bird.

Phase two of the project is about to be launched, during which 10 households on Tidy Street will for the first time measure their gas usage over the next six months.

“We are also looking at working with community groups based in the city, such as Brighton and Hove 10:10, to encourage other streets and organisations in the city, to start measuring their energy use,” says Bird, who has recently been approached by one school, keen to set up an electricity-use measuring project with its pupils.

Perhaps energy companies should take note. Next year sees the introduction of the “green deal”, a scheme whereby people can invest in energy efficiency improvements to their homes, community spaces and businesses at no upfront cost, instead paying through installments on their energy bills. Community engagement will be key to their ability to deliver the programme.

Smart Highway

“Glowing Lines uses photo-luminescent paint to mark out the edges of the road, and is the first of five concepts to be realised from Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde’s Smart Highway project – designed to make highways safer while saving money and energy.

Developed with infrastructure firm Heijmans, the paint absorbs solar energy during the day then illuminates at night. “Here the landscape becomes an experience of light and information,” said Studio Roosegaarde in a statement. “As a result this increases visibility and safety.” The lines are now installed along the N329 route in Oss for an initiative called Road of the Future. Three glowing green lines run along each side of the dual carriageway and illuminate every night.

Rooegaarde described driving along the section of road at night as “going through a fairy tale”. The project was first announced at Dutch Design Week 2012, and has since undergone a series of tests to gauge durability and user experience.

It was presented by Roosegaarde at the Design Indaba conference in Cape Town in 2013 and received an INDEX: Award later the same year.”

From dezeen

CSIS Data Chandelier

 

 

” Commissioned by the Center for Strategic and International Studies for their new headquarters in Washington, Sosolimited partnered with Hypersonic Engineering & Design, Plebian Design, and Chris Parlato to design, program, and fabricate one-of-a-kind chandelier. 425 hanging pendants form a map of the world when viewed from below. This map becomes a low-res display for illustrating global data such as GDP growth rate, renewable water resources, and energy consumption.

Each data set is paired with a lighting animation. In addition, CSIS can highlight regions of the map that correspond with international developments or events within the building. The entire system is automated, linking to web-based data to dynamically build animations. By parsing CSIS website, the team can identify countries in the news and highlight them on the chandelier.

The system currently uses UN Data GDP growth rate, USEIA Total Energy Consumption per capitaand Aquastat Total Renewable Water Resources per capita. Each of these data sets updates on an annual or quarterly basis. The team wrote a series of python scripts that process the data and colour an SVG map of world to match a normalized value for each set. An openFrameworks app loads these maps and uses the data to drive a series of animations. Each animation is unique to the data set and attempts to resemble the underlying data: water feels like rain drops, energy pulses, and GDP grows. There are also visual modes that let researches at CSIS select specific regions of the world to highlight – either to show conflict, or to show progress — John Rothenberg of SoSo Limited explains to CAN. Finally, the oF app outputs DMX to a series of DMX dimmer boards that control the light fixtures. Each pendant lights contains an MR-11 LED bulb that becomes a pixel in the display. “  from Creative Applications