Windows Phone Ad

Comical irony of this ad: it claims to offer us a savior that will end our perceived slavery to technology – in the form of more technology. As jarring as this logic is, it makes complete sense when taken as a prime example of capitalism taking something that could possibly subvert it and twisting it to its advantage.  “it can’t attempt to overthrow the tyranny of cellphones, because it is selling a phone” is spot-on – the obvious way to stop your phone from running your life is to get rid of it or at least stop carrying it all the time. This is problematic for capitalism because you can’t sell something that people can already do for free. The decision to address the problem (at least in the mind of the audience) without losing the ability to profit from its root cause is at once terrifyingly effective and par for the course.

On a slightly different (but hopefully related) tangent, the first part of this commercial can be easily construed as a panopticon. The people on their phones may be “connected” online, but the point the ad makes is how isolated they are in real life. The metaphorical observation tower here is occupied by the few people saying “Really? ” and the viewer watching the ad. The Windows Phone purports to break down the divisive cell walls of this panopticon, but all it’s really selling is the ability to pretend they don’t exist.  by Alex Beachum

From Critical commons