Tag: textiles

100 colors

 

The main interest in this project is to create ‘something’ to allow people to escape from the reality. Sometime it is good enough to don’t have other purpose that giving happiness, or well being. To bring back to David Steindl-Rast theory: Stop Look Go. Be great full.

“Emmanuelle Moureaux first conceived a floating volume of ’100 colors’ in 2013 for the shinjuku creators festa, delivering a massive suspended cloud of brilliant hues created from 840 sheets of paper from japanese paper manufacturer takeo. for the 2014 edition of the event, the french-born, toyko-based creative took her ’100 colors’ outdoors, transforming the water plaza in shinjuku central park; bringing a vibrancy to the urban site where high rise buildings soar in the background. this second installation was crafted instead from textiles — each of the 1875 strands have been individually hand-dyed — a medium which encouraged the entirety of the work to capture light breezes and sway in the wind. The brilliant tones layered with the surrounding skyscrapers, created quite the scene, bringing forth a breathtaking scene which encourages people to stop for a moment, and escape from their reality.” From Designboom

Irene Anton

 

Interesting work about network, with simple materials. Can be a source of inspiration for visualisation of flow, connections, transfers … in a 3D dimension.

“Intervention invading network‘ is a series of network installations by german artist irene anton in locations around the world. each piece is composed of between 100 and 150 recycled pairs of tights that have been knotted together and arranged into interconnected lines and nodes (where balls stuffed within the pantyhose create these bulbs).

The site-specific installations reference the encroaching nature of globalization and data flow in modern industrial society. While clearly connectable to the spread of the internet and the sometimes entrapping webs created by our use of various sites and applications, the project was specifically composed of textiles in order to reference another global industry: that of fashion. At the same time that individuals are caught up in the cycles of marketing and consumerism, the companies behind the industry have been the subject of high visibility concerns regarding sweatshops and worker’s rights, representing to anton the ways in which globalization is put into direct conflict with more ‘natural’ human needs and ways of living and working.”