Tag: flow

6 examples of Data visualisation

Some great data visualisation. Some are not conventional, other are interactives…, one thing that have in common is that they allow to understand and visualise the information very clearly and in a beautiful way.


Data Paris

Visualisation of the data about Paris and Parisians, organise around the subway network. Very well done, interactive and reliable sources. It gives a understanding of how the goods, humans, propriety are spread in the french capital.

 


The global flow of people

Explore new estimates of migration flows between and within regions for five-year periods, 1990 to 2010. Click on a region to discover flows country-by-country. It can help to visualise the ‘reality’ and transform some ‘stereotypes’.

 

 


Where does my money go

Where Does My Money Go? aims to promote transparency and citizen engagement through the analysis and visualisation of information about UK public spending.

 

 


Spending Stories

Spending Stories is a project by the Open Knowledge Foundation aiming at improving fiscal literacy and providing greater awareness of budget data worldwide.

 

 


Humans of New York

Creation of an exhaustive catalogue of New York City’s inhabitants. He set out to photograph 10,000 New Yorkers and plot their photos on a map, then he started collecting quotes and short stories from the people he met, and began including these snippets alongside the photographs. Taken together, these portraits and captions became the subject of a vibrant blog and collection of data. 


Information is beautiful

Finally, this website is dedicated to distilling the world’s data, information and knowledge into beautiful, interesting and, above all, useful visualizations, infographics and diagrams.

 

Irene Anton

 

Interesting work about network, with simple materials. Can be a source of inspiration for visualisation of flow, connections, transfers … in a 3D dimension.

“Intervention invading network‘ is a series of network installations by german artist irene anton in locations around the world. each piece is composed of between 100 and 150 recycled pairs of tights that have been knotted together and arranged into interconnected lines and nodes (where balls stuffed within the pantyhose create these bulbs).

The site-specific installations reference the encroaching nature of globalization and data flow in modern industrial society. While clearly connectable to the spread of the internet and the sometimes entrapping webs created by our use of various sites and applications, the project was specifically composed of textiles in order to reference another global industry: that of fashion. At the same time that individuals are caught up in the cycles of marketing and consumerism, the companies behind the industry have been the subject of high visibility concerns regarding sweatshops and worker’s rights, representing to anton the ways in which globalization is put into direct conflict with more ‘natural’ human needs and ways of living and working.”