Tag: dynamic

Scott Sona Snibbe – Boundary functions

Scott Snibbe is a pioneering digital artist and entrepreneur whose work includes apps, video, and interactive installations.

His statement

The purpose of my work is to bring meaning and joy to people’s lives. My work is frequently interactive, requiring viewers to physically engage with diverse media that include mobile devices, digital projections, and electromechanical sculpture. By using interactivity, I hope to promote an understanding of the world as interdependent; destroying the illusion that each of us, or any phenomenon, exists in isolation from the rest of reality.

Humans often think of themselves as embodied beings acting separately from their environment and other people. However, when we examine the object most of us take to be “me”—the body—we find it composed entirely of non-self elements: skin, cells, our parents’ genes, food, water, atoms originating from ancient stellar explosions, and these, as far as we know today, made up of pure energy. Furthermore, our bodies’ parts are in constant exchange with our environment and with others’ bodies through eating, respiration, immunology, and genetics. Similarly, the contents of our human minds are dependent: language, thoughts, memories, and preferences only emerge from our interactions with others. Even while alone, the imprints of our lifetime’s interactions propel our thoughts and memories. Such a view of interdependence has long been central to Buddhist philosophy, and has recently gained widespread validation from neuroscientists, social psychologists, and philosophers of emergence, chaos, and complexity theories.


Boundary Functions

We think of personal space as something that belongs entirely to ourselves. However, Boundary Functions shows us that personal space exists only in relation to others and changes without our control.

Boundary Functions is a set of lines projected from overhead onto the floor, dividing people in the gallery from one another. When there is one person on its floor, there is no response. When two are present, a single line cuts between them bisecting the floor, and dynamically changing as they move. With more than two people, the floor divides into cellular regions, each with the quality that all space within it is closer to the person inside than any one else.

The regions surrounding each person are referred to as Voronoi diagrams. These diagrams are widely used in diverse fields and spontaneously occur at all scales of nature. In anthropology and geography they describe patterns of human settlement; in biology, the patterns of animal dominance and plant competition; in chemistry the packing of atoms into crystals; in astronomy the influence of gravity on stars; in marketing the strategic placement of chain stores; in robotics path planning; and in computer science the solution to closest-point problems. The diagrams represent as strong a connection between mathematics and nature as the constants e or pi.

By projecting the diagram, the invisible relationships between individuals and the space between them become visible and dynamic. The intangible notion of personal space and the line that always exists between you and another becomes concrete. The installation doesn’t function at all with one person, as it requires a physical relationship to someone else. In this way Boundary Functions is a reversal of the lonely self-reflection of virtual reality, or the frustration of virtual communities: here is a virtual space that can only exist with more than one person, and in physical space.

The title, Boundary Functions, refers to Theodore Kaczynski’s 1967 University of Michigan PhD thesis. Better known as the Unabomber, Kaczynski is a pathological example of the conflict between the individual and society: engaging with an imperfect world versus an individual solitude uncompromised by the presence of others. The thesis itself is an example of the implicit antisocial quality of some scientific discourse, mired in language and symbols that are impenetrable to the vast majority of society. In this installation, a mathematical abstraction is made instantly knowable by dynamic visual representation.

 

Pink Street

Architects: Jose Adrião Arquitectos
Location: Rua Nova do Carvalho, Lisbon, Portugal
Design Team: Carla Gonçalves, Ricardo Aboim Inglez, Tiago Pereira
Project Year: 2012

 

 

 

” From the architect. In December 2011 Nova do Carvalho Street [Rua Nova do Carvalho] in Cais do Sodré was painted in pink colour. The gesture of painting a street in pink synthesizes in a very pragmatic and effective way the need for change. It created a dynamic public space, inclusive, opened and multifunctional which enables access to one of the most precious values of our time: information. At Pink Street one produces, shares and consumes culture.

The colour announced a change of which a significant number of people adhere. Nova do Carvalho Street at Cais do Sodré was named Pink Street. The proposal aims to strengthen the character established with the previous intervention, giving ot continuity and permanency.

The proposal consists of levelling the sidewalk with the road so as to turn the existing space in a public space without continuous barriers. Along the street 8 MUPIS are assembled, which can be used for exhibitions (individual/collectives, night/day) or simple to advertise for events taking place. The 8 MUPIS can be used as well as street lamps, in case they information/exhibition contained apart from light. These lamps may change its tonality according to the character of the event they are associated with.”  from Archdaily

Designing for alternate reality

OccultUs by Simon de Diesbach – Designing for alternate reality

Very interesting way to mix reality and virtuality
Reflexion on:
– reality and physical intervention are so powerful.
– how is it to be stuck between 2 worlds ?
– challenging perception

 

 

” Created by Simon de Diesbach at ECAL with the support from Alain Bellet, Gael Hugo, and Christophe Guignard, OccultUs is an installation that exploits the potential of the Oculus Rift technology by immersing the user into a sensory experience that mixes two distinct realities, physical and simulated.

The installation includes a collection of “abstract machines” designed to enhance the experience. What at first may seem like an uncomfortable scenario, user being seated in the centre of the unknown, the minimal virtual world takes over bringing the strange machinery to life, activated by the user’s gaze and creating a dynamic interplay between the virtual and the surrounding physical animations.

Users find themselves at the core of a hybrid space, where images and sound, though originating in heterogeneous realities, coincide. Stuck between two worlds, their perception is challenged. The OccultUs experience requests users’ participation in a double way: as the leading actor of the piece, but also as an integral part of it by becoming the object of other spectators’ attention.

Another interest element in the project is the physical abstraction of sound. Whilst there may have been more obvious choices behind how the sound is generated, their visual appearance if primarily driven by their function in virtual space. This raises many questions about how we may begin designing physical objects that complement and connect to our virtual experiences rather than the other way around. Traditionally we have sampled real life sounds to produce the digitally enhanced or manipulated. In this reverse scenario, we are using the real-world generated sounds to enhance the alternate reality.

OccultUs is a young project. The number of machines is limited for now. However, Simon’s objective is to increase their number and hence the diversity of sounds, in order to give a larger dimension to the experience. ”

From creativeapplications

Change the behaviour by bringing art

 

Is it possible to change behaviours by bringing ‘beautiful’ into public spaces ? I really believe in this idea. One of the main example of this is the ‘Art stations’ in Naples metro. It seems that the Italian city have the most sordid reputation, streets are dirty, it is viewed as a crime centre. Nevertheless they made amazing change in how people use and respect the subway station by bringing contemporary art in the corridors, elevators…

Art should help us to make our daily routine better, tele-transporting us in another more beautiful and superior dimension. This is in fact is the concept at the base of “Art Stations” in Naples metro, a project promoted by the city council to make the mobility spaces more charming, giving to everyone the possibility to meet contemporary art. Interior and exterior spaces of the stations received about 200 works of more than 100 eminent contemporary artists, creating one of the most interesting examples of decentralized museum, distributed on the whole urban area, a museum that becomes an expositive path that permits a dynamic fruition, not anymore a closed place. The realization of the different stations has been committed to internationally renowned architects and represents a strong requalification of big areas of the urban fabric.” Enzo Lofrano

“Artists come and present their vision of Naples to help Neapolitans see their city differently” Antonella Di Nocera

“This wasn’t about decorating the architecture, it’s about enhancing the space with the works of artists called on to dialogue with the space” Mr. Bonito Oliva