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Bike safety gadgets

Revolights from Emeryville, California

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Revolights are a system of white and red LEDs mounted on the bike’s front and rear wheels which light up as the wheels spin. Sensors calculate how fast the wheels are spinning and turn the LEDs on and off to create arcs of light – white at the front and red at the back – which are visible from all angles. The original idea was actually to try to make a more efficient headlight by getting the light as close to the ground as possible. After the first prototype. the creator realised the huge added side visibility the motion of the lights created, which if you ride a bike you know is a big deal. Based on that he quickly made a red version for the rear wheel, and Revolights was born.


See.sense intelligent bike light from Northern Ireland

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The See.sense “intelligent” bike light uses sensor technology from smartphones to assess the rider’s environment and responds by making them more visible when they need it most. When the sensors detect that the cyclist is at a road junction or roundabout, or passing through a dark underpass, it tells the light to flash faster and brighter.

“My epiphany came when I was cycling along looking at the smart phone on my handlebars. I realised that the smart sensor technology it contained could be used to give a light situational awareness. In essence, the light could be bright when it needed to be and conserve energy at other times. ”


 Mission Lumen from San Francisco

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The Lumen – handmade by Mission Bicycle of San Francisco – is the world’s first commercially available bike with a “retro-reflective” coating – with the frame and rims painted with hundreds of thousands of microscopic transparent spheres. The bike looks grey during the day – but when light hits the spheres at night it bounces straight back to the source, in a retro-reflective “cat’s eye” effect.


 Loud bicycle horn from Boston

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There are a few bike horns on the market at the moment but, unlike some noisier rivals, the Loud Bicycle Horn is deliberately set at 112 decibels – mimicking a typical car horn. The two-tone sound closely matches the pitch of a car horn too. Inventor Jonathan Lansey, a research engineer, says drivers react to car horns immediately – without locating where the sound has come from first.

“There are some bike horns that are louder than car horns,” he adds. “But we found that the sound of a ‘proper’ car horn is just right to get a driver’s attention without damaging your ears. There has been a lot of research showing that car horns are one of the best sounds to deter accidents.”


 Hövding airbag from Sweden

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The Hövding – stocked in UK shops for the first time this month, a couple of years after its launch – is an airbag collar which inflates in under a tenth of a second when it detects the abnormal movement associated with a crash. The company cites crash tests by Swedish insurance company Folksam, which compared the Hövding to traditional cycle helmets and found it performed far better in reducing the chances of serious head injury or fatal injury.


 Helios smart handlebars from California

Helios handlebars

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Helios handlebars feature a super-bright headlight at the front, and two lights on the ends of the bars which can be used as directional indicators. Once connected to a smartphone using Bluetooth, the bar-end lights flash to offer easy-to-see turn-by-turn GPS navigation too.

 

Article from The guardian